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Smoke Detector That Tells What Room Triggered Alarm


deirwin

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Does anyone know of a way to have my smoke and/or CO2 detectors tell me which detector triggered alarm?  It is daunting when the alarm goes off, and we have to run around to see where the problem may be (3 floors + 2 additional buildings).  Seems natural that system should say "Fire sensed in basement hall" or something like that.  We have an ELK M1G and quite a few sensors.

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Yes, there is, but it isn't simple.

 

Assuming you have an Elk and are sticking with that, then you would need to attach each smoke to its own zone to know which one triggered from the panel.  And then you would need a supervisory relay for each one.

 

You might consider breaking it down to 2 or 3 zones to narrow it down to a group of detectors.  This would require re-doing all the wiring if at present they all go to a single zone.

 

Keep in mind that without a supervisory relay a detector could go offline and you wouldn't know it.

 

Generally you put all the smokes on zone 16 and have them daisy chained with a single eol relay.  If power no longer is making it to the last detector then the eol relay opens causing your voltage on the zone to go from 7 to 14 giving you a trouble alert.  

 

This is code stuff and generally pretty real world useful, so I wouldn't screw it up.

 

The typical way to do what you want is to use addressable detectors with a panel that accepts such detectors.  This is commercial level equipment and quite pricey.

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Yes, there is, but it isn't simple.

 

Assuming you have an Elk and are sticking with that, then you would need to attach each smoke to its own zone to know which one triggered from the panel. And then you would need a supervisory relay for each one.

 

You might consider breaking it down to 2 or 3 zones to narrow it down to a group of detectors. This would require re-doing all the wiring if at present they all go to a single zone.

 

Keep in mind that without a supervisory relay a detector could go offline and you wouldn't know it.

 

Generally you put all the smokes on zone 16 and have them daisy chained with a single eol relay. If power no longer is making it to the last detector then the eol relay opens causing your voltage on the zone to go from 7 to 14 giving you a trouble alert.

 

This is code stuff and generally pretty real world useful, so I wouldn't screw it up.

 

The typical way to do what you want is to use addressable detectors with a panel that accepts such detectors. This is commercial level equipment and quite pricey.

What about using the Elk Two Way Wireless Smoke Detectors?

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What about using the Elk Two Way Wireless Smoke Detectors?

 

In the majority of places a hardwired solution must be the primary method to detect a fire / heat condition. Supplementary 2/4 wire along with wireless detectors can be used as a fail over back up.

 

But can not be be the primary method to detect a fire condition . . . 

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In the majority of places a hardwired solution must be the primary method to detect a fire / heat condition. Supplementary 2/4 wire along with wireless detectors can be used as a fail over back up.

 

But can not be be the primary method to detect a fire condition . . .

You have a url to this code? The Elk Two Way Wireless is UL268 compliant and based on the instruction manual for it there is nothing stating anything about electrical connections. At the end of the day its always best to check with your local codes and requirements.

 

Edit: FWIW I found this but its based on California state laws:

 

http://homeguides.sfgate.com/house-building-codes-smoke-alarms-101667.html

 

Code requirements mandate that smoke alarms must be hard-wired directly into the home’s electrical system and provided with a backup battery to keep the unit functioning during a power failure. Alarms are required to beep or otherwise indicate when the backup battery’s power is low. Smoke alarms powered by batteries alone are allowed if the home was built before building codes required hard-wired units. Many areas now require these battery-powered smoke alarms to be equipped with a nonremovable battery that's able to power the smoke alarm for at least 10 years. When the batteries fail in these units, the entire alarm is replaced rather than just the battery.

 

Under certain circumstances, the owners of homes built before the hard-wiring requirements were enacted must install updated smoke alarm systems if they undertake a home renovation project. Homeowners are exempt from this requirement, however, if the renovation is exclusive to the outside of the home or the project does not require the removal of any interior walls or ceilings. If, however, the project is extensive enough that the interior structure will be open and accessible, smoke alarms must be upgraded to meet current codes.

 

I live in Washington and based on this link I dont see anything specific to AC/wired.

 

http://app.leg.wa.gov/rcw/default.aspx?cite=43.44.110

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If your home is hardwired with existing smoke, Co, heat detectors via 120 VAC and you have direct access to the attic / basement you need to install hardwired detector(s) as the primary means of fire detection.

 

There is nothing stopping you from *adding* auxiliary and supplemental detectors such as those from a 2/4 wire security alarm system or from a dedicated fire control panel.

 

http://www.seattle.gov/DPD/Publications/CAM/cam317.pdf

 

http://www.cityofvancouver.us/fire/page/smoke-alarm-types-law

 

http://www.claxtonwalker.com/files/Requirements_for_smoke_alarms___carbon_monoxide_det_in_DC.pdf

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If your home is hardwired with existing smoke, Co, heat detectors via 120 VAC and you have direct access to the attic / basement you need to install hardwired detector(s) as the primary means of fire detection.

 

There is nothing stopping you from *adding* auxiliary and supplemental detectors such as those from a 2/4 wire security alarm system or from a dedicated fire control panel.

 

http://www.seattle.gov/DPD/Publications/CAM/cam317.pdf

 

http://www.cityofvancouver.us/fire/page/smoke-alarm-types-law

 

http://www.claxtonwalker.com/files/Requirements_for_smoke_alarms___carbon_monoxide_det_in_DC.pdf

Well I just got schooled. :) Doesn't matter for me, all my main smokes are hardwired. I did add an Elk wireless in my kitchen, master bedroom and server room as well as a heat detector in my garage. I wanted some to be monitored by the alarm company. Its a bit too late for neighbors to call the fire department when flames are shooting out the windows! Plus when I leave the house I want my dogs to be safe! ;)

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