Jump to content

How does the ISY hardware differ from a Raspberry Pi?


fasttimes

Recommended Posts

I can't imagine they are much different.  I personally think UDI should consider getting out of the hardware business and instead of selling the ISY, sell the software instead.  I don't think piracy would be that much of a concern, just lock the subscription to the MAC address.

 

Even at the lowest price point of $199, that is a deterrent for a lot of people considering there are other hubs that are much less expensive.  I would suggest going to a subscription model where you are renting the software, just like the ISY portal module.  At first, I was balking at paying for a 2-year rental but then realized setting  up an ha-bridge wasn't worth my time and that $49 for two years was very reasonable considering maintenance would be automatic.

Link to comment

I can't imagine they are much different.  I personally think UDI should consider getting out of the hardware business and instead of selling the ISY, sell the software instead.  I don't think piracy would be that much of a concern, just lock the subscription to the MAC address.

 

Even at the lowest price point of $199, that is a deterrent for a lot of people considering there are other hubs that are much less expensive.  I would suggest going to a subscription model where you are renting the software, just like the ISY portal module.  At first, I was balking at paying for a 2-year rental but then realized setting  up an ha-bridge wasn't worth my time and that $49 for two years was very reasonable considering maintenance would be automatic.

When the ISY was created, RPi didn't exist.

 

ISY will be porting to a new hardware base some day and has already jumped through three hardware designs so far (or more?)

 

Discussions elude to that a Linux based multi-core CPU box will be coming next. Apparently RPi has limiting licensing feature that prohibits ISY from going that direction. UDI has been researching this already.

 

The HA field is exploding and I am sure ISY will keep up with, maybe slightly late, but good and stable developments. Many have bit the dust with their exaggerated jumps.

Link to comment

Actually the hardware isn't all that different from the board found in a rPi, the real secret sauce is in the software and support.

 

One could only imagine having a ISY Series Controller using dual core / quad core processor using the most efficient software created by man - What could be done.

 

While everybody and their dog is pushing bloatware - UDI continues to lead the market in releasing software that is lean, mean, and maximizes all resources.

 

Lets hope the future will usher in new hardware that can have more headroom! 

Link to comment

There's a lot great about the ISY, but the negatives are fairly big ones.  I hate to be mean, but the scripting is absolutely atrocious.  Blow that up and start over.

 

  1. All scripts must be written in Python.
  2. Each script can be run manually or triggered via a condition (scheduled, device change, hooks, etc)
  3. Scripts can handle almost every function that can be done on the UI.  The only exception might be firmware updates.

I would be over the moon if you could do this because people could share their scripts.  Having the ability to link devices and create scenes from a script would make device setup and maintenance a snap.  The current UI is a hindrance.  Frankly forcing one to use a UI is a hindrance.

 

You could then rebuild/update your network using a script, even in a background process.  

Link to comment

There's a lot great about the ISY, but the negatives are fairly big ones.  I hate to be mean, but the scripting is absolutely atrocious.  Blow that up and start over.

 

  1. All scripts must be written in Python.
  2. Each script can be run manually or triggered via a condition (scheduled, device change, hooks, etc)
  3. Scripts can handle almost every function that can be done on the UI.  The only exception might be firmware updates.

I would be over the moon if you could do this because people could share their scripts.  Having the ability to link devices and create scenes from a script would make device setup and maintenance a snap.  The current UI is a hindrance.  Frankly forcing one to use a UI is a hindrance.

 

You could then rebuild/update your network using a script, even in a background process.  

 

I believe its safe to say the ISY Series Controller is a huge leap from the Insteon HUB's. But the programming logic of IF, Then, Else, is something most users can understand. If this wasn't true the emergence and web presence of IFTTT and similar would not have taken off as it has.

 

The ISY Series Controller offers several methods to interact with the unit via REST, etc.

 

Forcing the average user to learn Python isn't something the *General Public* would accept or take on. The reality is the mass adopted controllers from (Insert Name Here) were created for simplicity and ease of use. Its trying to balance a user interface that offers basic to advanced features which are hard for many vendors.

 

Those so interested have already embraced the *Polyglot* frame work offered by UDI. This single feature has open the doors to native nodes that can be represented in the ISY Series Controller as actual / virtual devices etc.

 

What does that require?

 

Lots of reading, learning, and understanding the computer language which I can assure you 99% of the common users have no interest to learn, do, or apply. They want a *Buy here now* and fire and forget which meets their needs for basic to medium access, integration, and control.

 

Those who are more skilled have embraced all of the above and have coded their hearts content to do incredible things. Again, what does that have to do with the general public? 99% of the people who bought the controller have no interest in learning *Yet again* another skill set that requires time most of them don't have.

 

The ISY Series Controller by shear market penetration doesn't even register on the *Public Radar*. You will of course hear, read, and see mention of sub par controllers of the likes of HUB II, Wink, Smartthings etc. Basic common things these three controllers offer: Cheap, Slick UI, Easy setup.

 

The ISY Series Controller is not cheap, slick, easy . . .

 

The above statement is from the perspective of all three of the HUB's I just mentioned offer a idiot proof *guided* set up process. 

 

The ISY Series Controller doesn't offer this user experience and assumes a basic understanding of computers, networking, and the ability to freaking read!

 

The other three are intended for the lowest common denominator who are cheap, mildly interested, and just curious. No body purchased a ISY Series Controller because they were cheap, lazy, mildly interested. They bought it because they realized this home automation thing wasn't just a passing fad but a long term investment into their home.

 

This distinction is exactly what I blog about every day with respect to energy monitoring / energy management. 99% of the people who enter energy monitoring are simply curious and have no real intention of ever doing a single thing to make a difference to manage their energy use and costs.

 

Its the 1% of the people who have grown up and grabbed a brain that realize and accept this is like anything in life it takes work, effort, and determination to meet goals. 

Link to comment

 

 

There's a lot great about the ISY, but the negatives are fairly big ones. I hate to be mean, but the scripting is absolutely atrocious. Blow that up and start over.

 

  • All scripts must be written in Python.
  • Each script can be run manually or triggered via a condition (scheduled, device change, hooks, etc)
  • Scripts can handle almost every function that can be done on the UI. The only exception might be firmware updates.
I would be over the moon if you could do this because people could share their scripts. Having the ability to link devices and create scenes from a script would make device setup and maintenance a snap. The current UI is a hindrance. Frankly forcing one to use a UI is a hindrance.

 

You could then rebuild/update your network using a script, even in a background process.

You can already do this from just about any scripting language you want, via the SOAP and REST APIs...

Link to comment

There's a lot great about the ISY, but the negatives are fairly big ones.  I hate to be mean, but the scripting is absolutely atrocious.  Blow that up and start over.

 

 

  • All scripts must be written in Python.
  • Each script can be run manually or triggered via a condition (scheduled, device change, hooks, etc)
  • Scripts can handle almost every function that can be done on the UI.  The only exception might be firmware updates.
I would be over the moon if you could do this because people could share their scripts.  Having the ability to link devices and create scenes from a script would make device setup and maintenance a snap.  The current UI is a hindrance.  Frankly forcing one to use a UI is a hindrance.

 

You could then rebuild/update your network using a script, even in a background process.

I have not seen any event driven features in python yet.

ISY is an event driven engine with a restricted syntax menu driven program writing environment.

 

Sure, I like python too but what happens when a coding error results in a simple light controlling algorithm? Does the program ignore it and do nothing by surprise to the user or does the interpreter error out and the whole HA control just hang?

 

What happens when a MS sends a trigger and the python code is in the middle of doing something else? Time delay loop?

 

The OS must be a event driven engine and I have worked with a few now and ISY does seems a little clumsy in spots but it forces even the beginner to code in a manner that won't stop the engine with errors.

 

In the old X10 days I often thought I would do better using VB to be able to freestyle writing my own HA programming code. OTOH: I had written code since 1972 since my first 384 bytes. This would restrct the userbase to very few, and special people.

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.


  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      36.6k
    • Total Posts
      368.1k
×
×
  • Create New...