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Looking for perfect Zwave Dimmer + MLV LED strip combo


sn0cr4sh

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I wonder if any of you have had any success finding a good combination of Zwave dimmer, magnetic low voltage (MLV) transformer, and LED strip lights?

 

I have a 100w Zurik magnetic low voltage transformer hooked up to a 20' run of LED strip lights, and I want dimming and Zwave control. A smooth ramp up / ramp down would be nice. The problem is I haven't had the best results with Zwave dimmer solutions yet - lots of flickering, strobing, buzzing, etc.  

 

If I use a Lutron Diva "dumb" switch, the lights are fantastic - dimming is smooth and clean and never a hint of strobing or flickering.  So I know this combination works well together. But there is no Zwave control, of course.

 

What I've tried:

  • At this very moment, I have a Linear Lamp dimmer module (PD300-Z2) plugged in to the setup, and its really really close.  The ramp up / down is smooth, but every now and then I will get some flickering or strobing. If I push it all the way up to 100%, that goes away and the light is clean.  But any dimming could cause that problem. It's pretty close, but not perfect.
  • I tried a Cooper RF Smart Zwave light fixture dimmer, and it was pretty bad. When it turns off the light, there is a sputter of flashing lights as it finally cuts off. The switch says MLV, but it sure doesn't seem to work like it is. Seems more like a bad PWM dimmer.

Possibles:

  • I've heard the Leviton VRMX1-1LZ is good, but I haven't seen any examples of it being used in front of an MLV transformer. 
  • Other Lamp dimmer modules?
  • Insteon?  I posted this here in the Zwave subforum - but are there Insteon switches that would accomplish this better? I suppose if there is, I could take advantage of the ISY's capability.  I don't have any Insteon gear at the moment - all Zwave.

 

 

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By Magnetic Low Voltage, do you mean actual Magnet Low Voltage (i.e. a bulky transformer, with an actual ferrous core)? Or some electronic gizmo that tries to be MLV-like?

 

I'd think that actual MLV would give smooth dimming with just about any dimmer.

 

If it's for a kitchen cabinet installation, there is usually plenty of otherwise-unusable space where a transformer could be placed.

 

Ah, it's not actually MLV.  I hate it that the industry accepts this misleading terminology. It's not magnetic. And it's not a transformer. At least it's LV.

 

http://www.flexfireleds.com/20w-24v-zurik-led-dimmable-driver/

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By Magnetic Low Voltage, do you mean actual Magnet Low Voltage (i.e. a bulky transformer, with an actual ferrous core)? Or some electronic gizmo that tries to be MLV-like?

 

I'd think that actual MLV would give smooth dimming with just about any dimmer.

 

If it's for a kitchen cabinet installation, there is usually plenty of otherwise-unusable space where a transformer could be placed.

 

Ah, it's not actually MLV.  I hate it that the industry accepts this misleading terminology. It's not magnetic. And it's not a transformer. At least it's LV.

 

http://www.flexfireleds.com/20w-24v-zurik-led-dimmable-driver/

 

Oh my.   :shock:  What's happening?  You mean the dimmer I have is not actually MLV at all?  It's a big dimmer, its super heavy, stupidly expensive. It says "magnetic". What the heck is it?

 

The one I have is actually the 12v 100w version. 

http://www.flexfireleds.com/zurik-magnetic-dimmable-led-drivers/100w-12v-zurik-led-dimmable-driver/

 

I don't care how big or bulky the thing is - its going in a basement closet. I just want it to work properly with a dimmer switch.

 

What would be an example of a "proper" MLV transformer?

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Have you already purchased/installed the LED strips? If not, it would be better to go with 24V, especially for a run from the basement. (How long?)

 

So-called "magnetic low voltage transformers" are electronic inverters that are meant to work well with leading-edge dimmers. Meant to. Not that they do.

 

- They aren't transformers. They are electronic inverters.

- They aren't "magnetic", as there is no transformer.

 

Leading-edge dimmers chop the AC signal on the leading edge. They are the oldest type of electronic dimmers, and work well with traditional resistive (e.g. tungsten light bulb) and magnetic loads. (e.g. traditional transformer driving low-voltage lighting.)

 

My experience with Lightech MLV "transformers" was similar to yours. And that wasn't even with LED lighting. (Just old-fashioned halogen.)

 

Just get the real deal, OR get a driver with integrated dimming. You CAN find Z-Wave drivers/dimmers, which may or may not be controllable with traditional electronic dimmers. I think most just have their own low-voltage dimming control that goes in a box, or are controllable ONLY through Z-Wave.  These will dim smoothly, because they control the output voltage directly.

 

Real transformer. Probably $75-$100.

 

http://www.usalight.com/General-Purpose-Indoor-Outdoor-Transformer-100-w-p/GPX100P.htm?gclid=CLvalOH_qs4CFRaSfgodAvILXA

 

https://www.zoro.com/intermatic-transformer-1-phase-100va-12v-out-px100/i/G4044144/?gclid=CLjjqfb_qs4CFYqPfgodkYcFrQ&gclsrc=aw.ds

 

You have to read the specs carefully unless you know what to look for. (Size and weight!)

 

A cheap, popular, Z-wave-only driver/dimmer for RGBW applications:

 

http://www.fibaro.com/us/the-fibaro-system/rgbw-controller

 

I dunno what's available for just one channel. A friend put in LED strips from eBay. (I have to say I will avoid their vendor, as the failure rate is high!) They got some weird but cool in-wall touch-panel controllers that lets them control color and brightness (for RGBW) and color temperature and brightness (for tunable color-temperature white). But the weird but cool in-wall touch-panel controllers only go in some strange European or Asian box, and they were left with no clue to to finish it off, and so the controllers are hanging out of the boxes... The controllers require multi-wire cable to a remote box with the electronics.

 

Either approach should work well.

 

- REAL transformer with any run-of-the-mill dimmer.

- Combo driver/dimmer meant specifically for LED lighting strips. 

 

I hate how we have had to create ridiculous retrofits to keep using legacy technology. All the good LED screw-base bulbs don't really use wall dimmers as dimmers. In fact, they have to go to pains to defeat the actual dimming to produce a regulated voltage that can then be controlled internally. It's tough I'd imagine making them work at the lower voltages from the dimmer. So, they have a circuit that can take any screwed-up chopped ugly waveform and give them enough regulated voltage to run the bulb. Then they "read" the PWM width to use as a signal to control the level. Of course, if you were designing from scratch, it would be about the most bass-awkwards way of going about it.

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Have you already purchased/installed the LED strips? If not, it would be better to go with 24V, especially for a run from the basement. (How long?)

 

So-called "magnetic low voltage transformers" are electronic inverters that are meant to work well with leading-edge dimmers. Meant to. Not that they do.

 

- They aren't transformers. They are electronic inverters.

- They aren't "magnetic", as there is no transformer.

 

Leading-edge dimmers chop the AC signal on the leading edge. They are the oldest type of electronic dimmers, and work well with traditional resistive (e.g. tungsten light bulb) and magnetic loads. (e.g. traditional transformer driving low-voltage lighting.)

 

My experience with Lightech MLV "transformers" was similar to yours. And that wasn't even with LED lighting. (Just old-fashioned halogen.)

 

Just get the real deal, OR get a driver with integrated dimming. You CAN find Z-Wave drivers/dimmers, which may or may not be controllable with traditional electronic dimmers. I think most just have their own low-voltage dimming control that goes in a box, or are controllable ONLY through Z-Wave.  These will dim smoothly, because they control the output voltage directly.

 

Real transformer. Probably $75-$100.

 

http://www.usalight.com/General-Purpose-Indoor-Outdoor-Transformer-100-w-p/GPX100P.htm?gclid=CLvalOH_qs4CFRaSfgodAvILXA

 

https://www.zoro.com/intermatic-transformer-1-phase-100va-12v-out-px100/i/G4044144/?gclid=CLjjqfb_qs4CFYqPfgodkYcFrQ&gclsrc=aw.ds

 

You have to read the specs carefully unless you know what to look for. (Size and weight!)

 

 

So the LED strips are installed already, and 12v. The run from the "transformer" to the start of the strip in question is only 6'.

 

I looked at the USALight Transformer. Spec for spec, it looks identical to the Zurik. They use the same words: "magnetic", "transformer", and the Zurik even says to use an "MLV dimmer". Funny enough, the enclosure that my Zurik is in is an exact match to the USALight (it has that tapered door hinge on it). Where would I know the difference?  

 

The Zurik is more expensive, and uses the phrase "LED Dimmable Driver". Is that my clue to the difference?  The USALight and Intermatic just say general purpose Transformer.  

 

So based on what you are saying, if I got a general purpose transformer, I could plug that directly in to the LED strip? And I could grab a generic rotary knob dimmer and put in between to dim the LED strips? I wouldn't need a "driver"?

 

Example: here's a product from Pegasus

https://www.pegasuslighting.com/12-volt-led-drivers/100w-12v-dc-hardwire-dimmable-magnetic-constant-voltage-led-driver-american-lighting.html

 

It also looks identical to the Zurik, but Pegasus have specifically stated it is not a Transformer - it is a Driver.

 

My brain hurts now.

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Sorry, my bad! The USALighting product I linked-to is NOT a real transformer. I didn't look at the specs closely enough. (And frankly, there isn't much in the way of specs at all for either of the links I gave...)

 

The clues are the size and the weight. (Though unfortunately, weight isn't specified for either, that I can find...)

 

This is a transformer! There are no electronic parts! Just metal, wire, and a bit of insulation. These satisfied our voltage-changing needs for the first 100 years of electrification...

 

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transformer

 

But I think I would forget about transformers. They will give you AC output. They are great for driving halogen buibs, since they don't care if they have AC or DC. AC works fine, and then you can control the transformer output voltage by using any dimmer on it's input. But, sorry, take it back, just not a good choice for LEDs. You COULD use a transformer - but then you would need to rectify and filter the output to produce DC. You could homebrew it. You could probably find some packaged product.

 

Sorry, was thinking of my old Lightoleeer track lighting with REAL transformers in the track fixtures.

 

Best approach would be combined dimmer/driver. The dimming function is PART of the driver. Might or might not be controllable with a wall dimmer, as more commonly they would have their own remote or wired control. (NOT an AC wall dimmer.)

 

The Fibaro is a starting point! I'd imagine there are similar single-channel products.

 

http://www.fibaro.com/us/the-fibaro-system/rgbw-controller

 

It has no use for a wall dimmer. It is controlled by Z-wave or it's own silly little remote.

 

I guess really there's no good reason NOT to use the Fibaro. Just use one channel. Note it still needs a power supply. Found a PDF manual:

 

http://www.fibaro.com/manuals/en/FGRGBWM-441-RGBW-Controller/FGRGBWM-441-RGBW-Controller-en-2.1-2.3.pdf

 

Be careful of the rating. Looks like it can handle 72W for single channel at 12V. (Total for multiple channels is less per channel). You supply it a constant 12V or 24V, your existing "transformer" will work. It provides up to 4 outputs (meant for RGBW) and it dims by chopping the output at a fairly high frequency (244hz) that you won't see. There is no wall dimmer involved. You send it Z-wave commands or use the supplied remote.

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Two thoughts:

1) If the devices are close enough and you have an IR output, you could try the Lutron Maestro IR Dimmer.

2) You could take a chance using a non-LED-rated linear DC power supply. I've had good luck using these and a manual dimmer on both 12vdc and 24vdc. Finding linear power supplies can be hard -- look for radio power supplies. They're generally far more stable than switching power supplies, which I try to avoid. They're also larger, heavier and less efficient.

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The Fibaro is a starting point! I'd imagine there are similar single-channel products.

 

http://www.fibaro.com/us/the-fibaro-system/rgbw-controller

 

It has no use for a wall dimmer. It is controlled by Z-wave or it's own silly little remote.

 

I guess really there's no good reason NOT to use the Fibaro. Just use one channel. Note it still needs a power supply. Found a PDF manual:

 

http://www.fibaro.com/manuals/en/FGRGBWM-441-RGBW-Controller/FGRGBWM-441-RGBW-Controller-en-2.1-2.3.pdf

 

Be careful of the rating. Looks like it can handle 72W for single channel at 12V. (Total for multiple channels is less per channel). You supply it a constant 12V or 24V, your existing "transformer" will work. It provides up to 4 outputs (meant for RGBW) and it dims by chopping the output at a fairly high frequency (244hz) that you won't see. There is no wall dimmer involved. You send it Z-wave commands or use the supplied remote.

 

I'll have to give the Fibaro a shot. The power rating sounds like its cutting it close. And yet, I saw this post where someone ran 65' of LED off it. That's kind of amazing.

https://community.smartthings.com/t/this-is-how-to-install-65-leds-light-strips-w-fibaro-rgbw-controller/51004

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The power rating sounds like its cutting it close. And yet, I saw this post where someone ran 65' of LED off it.

 

That person was using 24V strips.

 

The controller is rated 12A total, or 6A for single channel only, but the rating does not change with voltage. Thus you get 6 x 12 = 72W for 12V strips, or 6 x 24 = 144W for 24V strips.

 

There's another trick you can use, though, if you are stuck with 12V. The Fibaro can be configured for RGB, RGBW, or independent outputs. You could split your lighting into 2 or more segments. (More than 2 does not help capacity-wise, but still might be useful if you have different zones that you want to control brightness independently.)

 

So, if you split your lighting in two, now you can control 144W of single-color lighting. (288W if you had 24V strips.)

 

It seems ANY single output can drive 6A, though I suppose the intention is for RGBW the W will (or might) have more wattage. Thus, for 24V you can use 144W for the W, and another 144W total or the RGB.

 

I need to do this myself in the next couple of weeks! I wasn't planning on RGBW, as I don't think the W LEDs have as high a CRI as available in white-only strips. (But I'll do some checking next week.) This is probably the way I will go for dimming though! I have an area over the sink where separate control of the brightness might be useful (if I go with W only), as I would really need either greater brightness than the rest (if I run the strip only above the sink) or less brightness (if I run the strip above the sink and up the sides of the opening) than the rest of the under-counter strips. As well, I would also like to light to interior of one set of exposed (no doors) cabinets. And that likely would ideally have a different brightness level. So, I'm thinking I might split into 3 zones and use the independent control option.

 

​One concern that I have is that this is a lease, and so I will have to either leave something usable by a mere human, or else remove it when I move. (There was a cheap 12" fluorescent strip in the corner when I moved in...) I had thought the Fibaro came with some little remote, but I think I was thinking of some other, older product, that has an IR remote. I think some people use IR emitters to control those with an ISY.

 

Another option is to use a 0-10V controllable driver. They have internal dimming capability, and are dimmed based on a low-voltage (0-10V) control signal. You could use an Insteon analog output module with one. Here's a backgrounder from Lutron:

 

http://www.lutron.com/en-US/Education-Training/Documents/10V.pdf

 

Since you already have the driver/power supply, I'd guess the Fibaro solution will be more attractive.

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Oops, looks like Fibaro still is not supported by ISY!

 

Guess I'll be going with simple white LEDs, and a 0-10V dimmable driver. That gives me maximum flexibility and the ability to leave something simply-controlled when I leave my leased property. 

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Oops, looks like Fibaro still is not supported by ISY!

 

Guess I'll be going with simple white LEDs, and a 0-10V dimmable driver. That gives me maximum flexibility and the ability to leave something simply-controlled when I leave my leased property.

Oh shoot. I ordered the Fibaro. I didn't think it wouldn't be supported. I wonder if that device is coming soon or if I should just return it.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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I wonder, though, to what extent the Fibaro "isn't supported"? I'm going to check the Fibaro-specific threads. I wonder if, for example, it might just be seen as 4 dimmers, but lacks any way to set RGBA color conveniently. That would be fine for my application! (Since I only want to drive different strip segments with the multiple outputs.)

 

I'll ask on whatever Fibaro thread is most active, but in the mean time - anybody have any luck at ALL with the Fibaro controller? Does it have SOME functionality with ISY?

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I wonder, though, to what extent the Fibaro "isn't supported"? I'm going to check the Fibaro-specific threads. I wonder if, for example, it might just be seen as 4 dimmers, but lacks any way to set RGBA color conveniently. That would be fine for my application! (Since I only want to drive different strip segments with the multiple outputs.)

 

I'll ask on whatever Fibaro thread is most active, but in the mean time - anybody have any luck at ALL with the Fibaro controller? Does it have SOME functionality with ISY?

Since ZWave is just coming about in ISY, it may be included in the next release of V5, to be released next time Michel can't sleep at nights. :)

 

Dig deep.

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Sorry, a little late with this, but it turns out that Insteon does make a product that is ideal for single-color under-cabinet lighting, though it's a tad expensive.

 

You would have to use it with a 0-10V driver. With this type of driver, you should be able to dim to 3% with no issues. (The 3% limitation is only because it has only 32 dimming levels - the drivers are capable of 1% or less.) (So, this would NOT work with your existing driver.) You will never get below 10% with a driver run on the output of a triac dimmer! (e.g. common wall dimmer, Insteon wall dimmers, etc.)

 

While the sales literature describes it as a "fluorescent ballast dimmer", really, it's just a 0-10V control-voltage output. (Along with two additional relay outputs.)

 

I think this is what I will use in my installation!

 

The manual does mention LED, and the one online review I found is from somebody who used it to dim an LED fixture. (It has to be one that accepts a 0-10V control signal for brightness.)

 

http://www.smarthome.com/insteon-2475da2-0-10vdc-ballast-dimmer-dual-band.html

http://www.insteon.com/0-10v-ballast-dimmer/

 

You would use it with a driver like this:

 

  https://www.diodeled.com/0-10v-dimmable-led-drivers.html

 

 

Here's a bunch of choices on eBay. Not saying these are all top quality, LOL!

 

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=led+driver+0-10v&clk_rvr_id=1078251704142&adpos=1o1&treatment_id=7&crlp=107211876301_1647&MT_ID=69&device=c&rlsatarget=kwd-52276302995&keyword=led+driver+0-10v&geo_id=10232&poi=&crdt=0&ul_noapp=true

 

To make it all legal, you should install each device (Insteon remote ballast dimmer and 0-10V driver) in a listed dual-voltage enclosure. (Or find one that will fit both). (It's just a metal box with internal separation to keep line voltage and low-voltage in separate compartments.)

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Sorry, a little late with this, but it turns out that Insteon does make a product that is ideal for single-color under-cabinet lighting, though it's a tad expensive.

 

You would have to use it with a 0-10V driver. With this type of driver, you should be able to dim to 3% with no issues. (The 3% limitation is only because it has only 32 dimming levels - the drivers are capable of 1% or less.) (So, this would NOT work with your existing driver.) You will never get below 10% with a driver run on the output of a triac dimmer! (e.g. common wall dimmer, Insteon wall dimmers, etc.)

 

While the sales literature describes it as a "fluorescent ballast dimmer", really, it's just a 0-10V control-voltage output. (Along with two additional relay outputs.)

 

I think this is what I will use in my installation!

 

The manual does mention LED, and the one online review I found is from somebody who used it to dim an LED fixture. (It has to be one that accepts a 0-10V control signal for brightness.)

 

http://www.smarthome.com/insteon-2475da2-0-10vdc-ballast-dimmer-dual-band.html

http://www.insteon.com/0-10v-ballast-dimmer/

 

You would use it with a driver like this:

 

  https://www.diodeled.com/0-10v-dimmable-led-drivers.html

 

 

Here's a bunch of choices on eBay. Not saying these are all top quality, LOL!

 

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=led+driver+0-10v&clk_rvr_id=1078251704142&adpos=1o1&treatment_id=7&crlp=107211876301_1647&MT_ID=69&device=c&rlsatarget=kwd-52276302995&keyword=led+driver+0-10v&geo_id=10232&poi=&crdt=0&ul_noapp=true

 

To make it all legal, you should install each device (Insteon remote ballast dimmer and 0-10V driver) in a listed dual-voltage enclosure. (Or find one that will fit both). (It's just a metal box with internal separation to keep line voltage and low-voltage in separate compartments.)

Sounds real clumsy (and expensive) using three boxes for every light bulb/strip. The Insteon 0-10v module always sound really cool for something else though.

 

You will have to mount and conceal the Insteon module, that takes a receptacle socket, a power supply, that takes another receptacle socket and the 0-10v LED driver amplifier.

 

Using MiLights or Hue strips only take two modules for each section, but requires a bridge, somewhere else, to convert Ethernet to the proprietary signal. Mine is plugged into the USB port on my router, for power only.

 

Bridge/hub (4 addresses of lights) aprox $18. 12v 6A power supply with 2.1mm x 5.1mm plug to match, aprox $12, LED driver aprox $15, all on ebay.ca or ebay.com

 

The above are all for RGBW but monochrome are cheaper.

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You will have to mount and conceal the Insteon module, that takes a receptacle socket, a power supply, that takes another receptacle socket and the 0-10v LED driver amplifier.

 

 

I'm going to use the unused outlet from the duplex that my microwave is plugged-in to. It's in an overhead cabinet.

 

There are only two boxes: the Insteon module and the 0-10V LED driver. The driver has an integrated power supply (unlike the Fibaro, which just chops the voltage it gets from a power supply).

 

Yes, I'll have to use a Y-splitter on that one outlet. (NOT one of those awful cube taps - I have some handy-dandy 6" Y-splitters.)

Using MiLights or Hue strips only take two modules for each section, but requires a bridge, somewhere else, to convert Ethernet to the proprietary signal. Mine is plugged into the USB port on my router, for power only.

 

 

I considered Hue, but they do not have the kind of CRI that I want. I'd like to use the Yujis. (Claimed CRI as high as 98). If I'm going to use white, I want a high-quality white.

 

    http://www.yujiintl.com/high-cri-led-lighting

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The Insteon module does not put out enough power to power an LED strip.

It isn't specified in the Insteon spec. but it is only a very small current, voltage output, capable of driving the sensing of a variable out lamp ballast circuit., not with any size of a load.

 

Yes, the CRI is a good consideration. I find the MiLight RGBWW strips a much nicer white light than the Hue and most other plain LED bulbs I have elsewhere in the house. I get tired of the weak whites from CFL and earlier LED bulbs I have. A room full of different brands seems to help.

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The Insteon module does not put out enough power to power an LED strip.

 

 

It doesn't need to. It just needs to drive a 0-10V control input on the driver/power supply. It's just a reference voltage. This is exactly what it was designed to do.

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It doesn't need to. It just needs to drive a 0-10V control input on the driver/power supply. It's just a reference voltage. This is exactly what it was designed to do.

Sorry. I misread it.

-(unlike the Fibaro, which just chops the voltage it gets from a power supply)

 

understood it as the Insteon output by mistake.

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  • 3 weeks later...

So I decided to go with a 0-10V-controllable driver, since the deal on the Insteon remote 0-10V dimmer just got too good!


 


It's on special for $49.95 (normal price $119). AND they applied the 23% discount, bringing it to $38.47. Thought I'd post in case others are interested, you can still catch the deal today.


 


Note that I ordered by phone, because I had a store credit, and multiple accounts due to ordering in past without an online account. (Apparently, I have MANY multiple accounts and "they wish" they had the ability to merge accounts...). So, might have been an error, but the system did show the rep that the discount was applicable.


 


To be clear, this "dimmer" provides a 0-10V reference voltage, which can be used to dim 0-10V dimmable devices. It is a common standard used by fluorescent dimmers (note some older ones use 1-10V), SOME LED drivers, etc. With the right driver, this will provide "architectural" dimming down to 1%.


 


Will follow-up once I have  the strip and driver!

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  • 1 month later...

Sorry, a little late with this, but it turns out that Insteon does make a product that is ideal for single-color under-cabinet lighting, though it's a tad expensive.

 

You would have to use it with a 0-10V driver. With this type of driver, you should be able to dim to 3% with no issues. (The 3% limitation is only because it has only 32 dimming levels - the drivers are capable of 1% or less.) (So, this would NOT work with your existing driver.) You will never get below 10% with a driver run on the output of a triac dimmer! (e.g. common wall dimmer, Insteon wall dimmers, etc.)

 

While the sales literature describes it as a "fluorescent ballast dimmer", really, it's just a 0-10V control-voltage output. (Along with two additional relay outputs.)

 

I think this is what I will use in my installation!

 

The manual does mention LED, and the one online review I found is from somebody who used it to dim an LED fixture. (It has to be one that accepts a 0-10V control signal for brightness.)

 

http://www.smarthome.com/insteon-2475da2-0-10vdc-ballast-dimmer-dual-band.html

http://www.insteon.com/0-10v-ballast-dimmer/

 

You would use it with a driver like this:

 

  https://www.diodeled.com/0-10v-dimmable-led-drivers.html

 

 

Here's a bunch of choices on eBay. Not saying these are all top quality, LOL!

 

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=led+driver+0-10v&clk_rvr_id=1078251704142&adpos=1o1&treatment_id=7&crlp=107211876301_1647&MT_ID=69&device=c&rlsatarget=kwd-52276302995&keyword=led+driver+0-10v&geo_id=10232&poi=&crdt=0&ul_noapp=true

 

To make it all legal, you should install each device (Insteon remote ballast dimmer and 0-10V driver) in a listed dual-voltage enclosure. (Or find one that will fit both). (It's just a metal box with internal separation to keep line voltage and low-voltage in separate compartments.)

 

Hello,

 

Did you get the ballast dimmer to work as you wanted to? I have no success and would really appreciate some help please.

 

Thank you!

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So I decided to go with a 0-10V-controllable driver, since the deal on the Insteon remote 0-10V dimmer just got too good!

 

It's on special for $49.95 (normal price $119). AND they applied the 23% discount, bringing it to $38.47. Thought I'd post in case others are interested, you can still catch the deal today.

 

Note that I ordered by phone, because I had a store credit, and multiple accounts due to ordering in past without an online account. (Apparently, I have MANY multiple accounts and "they wish" they had the ability to merge accounts...). So, might have been an error, but the system did show the rep that the discount was applicable.

 

To be clear, this "dimmer" provides a 0-10V reference voltage, which can be used to dim 0-10V dimmable devices. It is a common standard used by fluorescent dimmers (note some older ones use 1-10V), SOME LED drivers, etc. With the right driver, this will provide "architectural" dimming down to 1%.

 

Will follow-up once I have  the strip and driver!

 

 

Hello,

 

Did you get this to work? I have no success with the ballast dimmer and would really appreciate some help.

 

Thank you.

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I have neither the LED strip nor the driver yet. Really, waiting for a holiday sale or discount code for the very expensive, highest-CRI-on-the-planet LED strip I want to use (Yuji).

 

I do have a second ballast dimmer, that I need to send back. (Package went missing, SmartHome replaced. A month later, original package showed up in front of my door, opened...) I will run the same tests on that dimmer to see if it is the same as the other.

 

Your results were very strange. You should not get nearly 20V from it. (You reported that for one of your two.) You need to contact Insteon support!

 

When you say "no success", are you referring to the results you previously reported? Or something else yet?

 

Assuming you didn't wire them in series or parallel or anything else strange?

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