Jump to content

Range extenders -- Ring Gen 2 vs Aeotec 7? Will ISY994 benefit from expanded range of Aeotec Range Extender 7?


KeviNH

Recommended Posts

Having Z-wave mesh issues at my non-profit, looking for the best bang for our buck -- do we buy two older "Range Extenders" or wait for a backordered Aeotec RE7 to finally ship?

Does the claimed greater range/power of the Aeotec 700 extender apply in an ISY994 network with mostly older Z-wave devices?

Currently best priced in-stock plug-in z-wave device is the "Ring Alarm Range Extender (2nd Gen)", is this what we should go with rather than spend +$30 on a smart plug that is going somewhere we'll never use the plug part?

Normally I'd go with hardwired power on motion sensors, but those also are tough to find in stock and also expensive (see "non-profit" in first sentence)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So the answer to "Does the claimed greater range/power of the Aeotec 700 extender apply in an ISY994 network with mostly older Z-wave devices?" would be "No"?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Barring somebody getting the straight dope from Aeotec or Silicon Labs, I'm not sure that "No" really is the answer.

For example, regarding "the amplification could potentially help your system", I suspect that if I swap out my old repeaters for Range Extender 7, then I should be able to have a greater distance for the hops that go from one 700 extender to a second 700 device.

Only way to be sure is to test it, or to get Aeotec or Silicon Labs to respond to my question...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, KeviNH said:

Barring somebody getting the straight dope from Aeotec or Silicon Labs, I'm not sure that "No" really is the answer.

For example, regarding "the amplification could potentially help your system", I suspect that if I swap out my old repeaters for Range Extender 7, then I should be able to have a greater distance for the hops that go from one 700 extender to a second 700 device.

Only way to be sure is to test it, or to get Aeotec or Silicon Labs to respond to my question...

You certainly have a point as far as distance, but speed will be at the lowest common denominator.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, KeviNH said:

Barring somebody getting the straight dope from Aeotec or Silicon Labs, I'm not sure that "No" really is the answer.

For example, regarding "the amplification could potentially help your system", I suspect that if I swap out my old repeaters for Range Extender 7, then I should be able to have a greater distance for the hops that go from one 700 extender to a second 700 device.

Only way to be sure is to test it, or to get Aeotec or Silicon Labs to respond to my question...

Then why bother asking on here instead of those sites if you're going to argue with the answer.

It's already been well established as fact that zwave send signals at the lowest common denominator. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Am not that familiar with zwave but do have about 10 devices (locks, thermostats, outlets and plug-warts) in my ISY, but with Insteon's potential demise, I have been looking at some replacement / new z-wave devices. 

If my zwave mesh operates at the lowest common denominator  in terms of speed, is there a way to tell what speed / series, each device is via the ISY? Or another way? Both out of curiosity but also to potential replace older. slower ones if they are the bottleneck.

thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, dbwarner5 said:

If my zwave mesh operates at the lowest common denominator  in terms of speed, is there a way to tell what speed / series, each device is via the ISY? Or another way? Both out of curiosity but also to potential replace older. slower ones if they are the bottleneck.

Realistically, given the small packet size of Z-wave commands, "speed" is not really a significant concern -- even the fastest 700 devices only move data at 0.1 mbit/s (still ten times faster than the original 100 chipset)

The biggest bottleneck and the greatest influence on range, reliability, and battery life is going to be the chipset of your controller.

Quote

is there a way to tell what speed / series, each device is via the ISY? Or another way?

That's a good question.   I suppose you could physically go to each device and write down the FCC ID.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, dbwarner5 said:

Am not that familiar with zwave but do have about 10 devices (locks, thermostats, outlets and plug-warts) in my ISY, but with Insteon's potential demise, I have been looking at some replacement / new z-wave devices. 

If my zwave mesh operates at the lowest common denominator  in terms of speed, is there a way to tell what speed / series, each device is via the ISY? Or another way? Both out of curiosity but also to potential replace older. slower ones if they are the bottleneck.

thanks.

Unfortunately there is not. I'd start with your board. If you have the 300 board then it doesn't matter the devices. Everything will operate at 300 level. 

If you have the 500 board, I'd look at when you purchased your devices. Anything you bought in the last few years increases the likelihood of being zwave plus. Zwave doesn't pick and choose based on device series so any older devices will affect your system. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.


×
×
  • Create New...